Keys to Successful Interviews

Keys to Successful Interviews
 sucintervDON’T interview for positions you don’t want. DO communicate to the interviewer that you want the position (and why) and that there is an excellent chance that you would accept their offer (if this is true).
 BE PREPARED. Most interviews are won or lost based on reparation. Don’t assume that because the interviewer is a Fletcher alum you can be less well-prepared.
 Have several good questions to ask the interviewer.

Don’t be passive.


Frame whatever you say positively, even if asked negatively (“What did you like least about your previous work as a …”)


Get across your agenda: three or four selling points for that position. Give examples to demonstrate each of those selling points.
 Connect your personal and professional experiences to the position description and the particular questions asked during your interview. The interviewer wants to get to know you. The more you create a
personal connection, the better the impression, and thus, your chances of securing the job you want.
 Know where you are on your career path and how the employer fits in. Having a clear idea of what you want to do and how you plan on getting there conveys confidence and drive. Scattered interests
and vague plans, on the other hand, send the wrong signals.
 Be honest with yourself and the interviewer. You don’t want to talk your way into the wrong position.
 PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!!! (And do it before your interviews.)

Be prepared for questions you hope they won’t ask (e.g., resume gap, previous unrelated experience.)

Be matter of fact in your responses, not defensive.

Even if you’re being interviewed for a summer position, know that the company is thinking about you long term.
Post-Interview Suggestions
 ALWAYS send a thank-you letter reiterating why you are a good fit for the position. Ask follow-up questions or highlight something you failed to mention during the interview.


If alumni or references have championed you for the job, let them know whether you are going to accept or decline the job before you tell the recruiter.

 If you decline a job, make sure the reason you give is framed in a way to consider the recruiters’ egos and reflects your professionalism. (“Bad” answer: “I really only want the job for a year.” “Better”
answer: “This was a very difficult decision, but I have decided to accept another offer.”)

 

 


Don’t see what you’re looking for? Contact Us
This is a post from: BalliGifts.com Your # 1 Online Store for Cool Gifts

Share

English Proverbs V-Z

1000 English Proverbs

(letter V-Z: 948-1000)

948. Velvet paws hide sharp claws.

949. Virtue is its own reward.
950. Wait for the cat to jump.
951. Walls have ears.
952. Wash your dirty linen at home.
953. Waste not, want not.
954. We know not what is good until we have lost it.
955. We never know the value of water till the well is dry.
956. We shall see what we shall see.
957. We soon believe what we desire.
958. Wealth is nothing without health.
959. Well begun is half done.
960. What can’t be cured, must be endured.
961. What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
962. What is done by night appears by day.
963. What is done cannot be undone.
964. What is got over the devil’s back is spent under his belly.
965. What is lost is lost.
966. What is sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander.
967. What is worth doing at alt is worth doing well.
968. What must be, must be.
969. What the heart thinks the tongue speaks.
970. What we do willingly is easy.
971. When angry, count a hundred.
972. When at Rome, do as the Romans do.
973. When children stand quiet, they have done some harm.
974. When flatterers meet, the devil goes to dinner.
975. When guns speak it is too late to argue.
976. When pigs fly.
977. When Queen Anne was alive.
978. When the cat is away, the mice will play.
979. When the devil is blind.
980. When the fox preaches, take care of your geese.
981. When the pinch comes, you remember the old shoe.
982. When three know it, alt know it.
983. When wine is in wit is out.
984. Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
985. While the grass grows the horse starves.
986. While there is life there is hope.
987. Who breaks, pays.
988. Who has never tasted bitter, knows not what is sweet.
989. Who keeps company with the wolf, will learn to howl.
990. Wise after the event.
991. With time and patience the leaf of the mulberry becomes satin.
992. Words pay no debts.
993. You can take a horse to the water but you cannot make him drink.
994. You cannot eat your cake and have it.
995. You cannot flay the same ox twice.
996. You cannot judge a tree by it bark.
997. You cannot teach old dogs new tricks.
998. You cannot wash charcoal white.
999. You made your bed, now lie in it.
1000. Zeal without knowledge is a runaway horse.

 

English Proverbs V-Z

 

 


Don’t see what you’re looking for? Contact Us
This is a post from: BalliGifts.com Your # 1 Online Store for Cool Gifts

Share

English Proverbs T

1000 English Proverbs (letter T: 757-947)

757. Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves.
758. Take us as you find us.
759. Tarred with the same brush.
760. Tastes differ.
761. Tell that to the marines.
762. That cock won’t fight.
763. That which one least anticipates soonest comes to pass.
764. That’s a horse of another colour.
765. That’s where the shoe pinches!Shoes1

 

 

 

 

766. The beggar may sing before the thief (before a footpad).
767. The best fish smell when they are three days old.
768. The best fish swim near the bottom.Sign---Fish1
769. The best is oftentimes the enemy of the good.
770. The busiest man finds the most leisure.
771. The camel going to seek horns lost his ears.
772. The cap fits.
773. The cask savours of the first fill.
774. The cat shuts its eyes when stealing cream.
775. The cat would eat fish and would not wet her paws.
776. The chain is no stronger than its weakest link.
777. The cobbler should stick to his last.
778. The cobbler’s wife is the worst shod.
779. The darkest hour is that before the dawn.
780. The darkest place is under the candlestick.
781. The devil is not so black as he is painted.
782. The devil knows many things because he is old.
783. The devil lurks behind the cross.
784. The devil rebuking sin.
785. The dogs bark, but the caravan goes on.Polo---Dogs1
786. The Dutch have taken Holland !
787. The early bird catches the worm.
788. The end crowns the work.
789. The end justifies the means.
790. The evils we bring on ourselves are hardest to bear.
791. The exception proves the rule.
792. The face is the index of the mind.
793. The falling out of lovers is the renewing of love.
794. The fat is in the fire.
795. The first blow is half the battle.
796. The furthest way about is the nearest way home.
797. The game is not worth the candle.
798. The heart that once truly loves never forgets.
799. The higher the ape goes, the more he shows his tail.
800. The last drop makes the cup run over.
801. The last straw breaks the camel’s back.
802. The leopard cannot change its spots.
803. The longest day has an end.
804. The mill cannot grind with the water that is past.
805. The moon does not heed the barking of dogs.
806. The more haste, the less speed.
807. The more the merrier.
808. The morning sun never lasts a day.
809. The mountain has brought forth a mouse.
810. The nearer the bone, the sweeter the flesh.
811. The pitcher goes often to the well but is broken at last.
812. The pot calls the kettle black.
813. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.
814. The receiver is as bad as the thief.
815. The remedy is worse than the disease.
816. The rotten apple injures its neighbours.
817. The scalded dog fears cold water.
818. The tailor makes the man.
819. The tongue of idle persons is never idle.
820. The voice of one man is the voice of no one.
821. The way (the road) to hell is paved with good intentions.
822. The wind cannot be caught in a net.
823. The work shows the workman.
824. There are lees to every wine.
825. There are more ways to the wood than one.
826. There is a place for everything, and everything in its place.
827. There is more than one way to kill a cat.
828. There is no fire without smoke.
829. There is no place like home.
830. There is no rose without a thorn.
831. There is no rule without an exception.
832. There is no smoke without fire.
833. There’s many a slip ‘tween (== between) the cup and the lip.
834. There’s no use crying over spilt milk.
835. They are hand and glove.
836. They must hunger in winter that will not work in summer.
837. Things past cannot be recalled.
838. Think today and speak tomorrow.
839. Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones.
840. Time and tide wait for no man.
841. Time cures all things.
842. Time is money.
843. Time is the great healer.
844. Time works wonders.
845. To add fuel (oil) to the fire (flames).
846. To angle with a silver hook.
847. To be born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth.
848. To be head over ears in debt.
849. To be in one’s birthday suit.
850. To be up to the ears in love.
851. To be wise behind the hand.
852. To beat about the bush.
853. To beat the air.
854. To bring grist to somebody’s mill.
855. To build a fire under oneself.
856. To buy a pig in a poke.
857. To call a spade a spade.
858. To call off the dogs.
859. To carry coals to Newcastle.
860. To cast pearls before swine.
861. To cast prudence to the winds.
862. To come away none the wiser.
863. To come off cheap.
864. To come off with a whole skin.
865. To come off with flying colours.
866. To come out dry.
867. To come out with clean hands.
868. To cook a hare before catching him.
869. To cry with one eye and laugh with the other.
870. To cut one’s throat with a feather.
871. To draw (pull) in one’s horns.
872. To drop a bucket into an empty well.
873. To draw water in a sieve.
874. To eat the calf in the cow’s belly.
875. To err is human.
876. To fiddle while Rome is burning.
877. To fight with one’s own shadow.
878. To find a mare’s nest.
879. To fish in troubled waters.
880. To fit like a glove.
881. To flog a dead horse.
882. To get out of bed on the wrong side.
883. To give a lark to catch a kite.
884. To go for wool and come home shorn.
885. To go through fire and water (through thick and thin).
886. To have a finger in the pie.
887. To have rats in the attic.
888. To hit the nail on the head.
889. To kick against the pricks.
890. To kill two birds with one stone.
891. To know everything is to know nothing.
892. To know on which side one’s bread is buttered.
893. To know what’s what.
894. To lay by for a rainy day.
895. To live from hand to mouth.
896. To lock the stabledoor
after the horse is stolen.
897. To look for a needle in a haystack.
898. To love somebody (something) as the devil loves holy water.
899. To make a mountain out of a molehill.
900. To make both ends meet.
901. To make the cup run over.
902. To make (to turn) the air blue.
903. To measure another man’s foot by one’s own last.
904. To measure other people’s corn by one’s own bushel.
905. To pay one back in one’s own coin.
906. To plough the sand.
907. To pour water into a sieve.
908. To pull the chestnuts out of the fire for somebody.
909. To pull the devil by the tail.
910. To put a spoke in somebody’s wheel.
911. To put off till Doomsday.
912. To put (set) the cart before the horse.
913. To rob one’s belly to cover one’s back.
914. To roll in money.
915. To run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.
916. To save one’s bacon.
917. To send (carry) owls to Athens .
918. To set the wolf to keep the sheep.
919. To stick to somebody like a leech.
920. To strain at a gnat and swallow a camel.
921. To take counsel of one’s pillow.
922. To take the bull by the horns.
923. To teach the dog to bark.
924. To tell tales out of school.
925. To throw a stone in one’s own garden.
926. To throw dust in somebody’s eyes.
927. To throw straws against the wind.
928. To treat somebody with a dose of his own medicine.
929. To use a steamhammer
to crack nuts.
930. To wash one’s dirty linen in public.
931. To wear one’s heart upon one’s sleeve.
932. To weep over an onion.
933. To work with the left hand.
934. Tomorrow come never.
935. Too many cooks spoil the broth.
936. Too much knowledge makes the head bald.
937. Too much of a good thing is good for nothing.
938. Too much water drowned the miller .
939. Too swift arrives as tardy as too slow.
940. True blue will never stain.
941. True coral needs no painter’s brush.
942. Truth comes out of the mouths of babes and sucklings.
943. Truth is stranger than fiction.
944. Truth lies at the bottom of a well.
945. Two blacks do not make a white.
946. Two heads are better than one.
947. Two is company, but three is none.

 

 


Don’t see what you’re looking for? Contact Us
This is a post from: BalliGifts.com Your # 1 Online Store for Cool Gifts

Share

English Proverbs P-S

1000 English Proverbs (letter P-S: 697-756)

697. Packed like herrings.
698. Patience is a plaster for all sores.
699. Pennywise and poundfoolish.
700. Pleasure has a sting in its tail.
701. Plenty is no plague.
702. Politeness costs little (nothing), but yields much.
703. Poverty is no sin.
704. Poverty is not a shame, but the being ashamed of it is.
705. Practise what you preach.
706. Praise is not pudding.Pudding-Silence in the LibrarySilence-in
707. Pride goes before a fall.
708. Procrastination is the thief of time.
709. Promise is debt.
710. Promise little, but do much.
711. Prosperity makes friends, and adversity tries them.
712. Put not your hand between the bark and the tree.
713. Rain at seven, fine at eleven.
714. Rats desert a sinking ship.
715. Repentance is good, but innocence is better.
716. Respect yourself, or no one else will respect you.
717. Roll my log and I will roll yours.
718. Rome was not built in a day.
719. Salt water and absence wash away love.
720. Saying and doing are two things.
721. Score twice before you cut once.
722. Scornful dogs will eat dirty puddings.
723. Scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.
724. Self done is soon done.
725. Self done is well done.
726. Self is a bad counsellor.
727. Selfpraise
is no recommendation.
728. Set a beggar on horseback and he’ll ride to the devil.
729. Set a thief to catch a thief.
730. Shallow streams make most din.
731. Short debts (accounts) make long friends.
732. Silence gives consent.
733. Since Adam was a boy.
734. Sink or swim!
735. Six of one and half a dozen of the other.
736. Slow and steady wins the race.
737. Slow but sure.
738. Small rain lays great dust.
739. So many countries, so many customs.
740. So many men, so many minds.
741. Soft fire makes sweet malt.
742. Something is rotten in the state of Denmark .
743. Soon learnt, soon forgotten.
744. Soon ripe, soon rotten.
745. Speak (talk) of the devil and he will appear (is sure to appear).
746. Speech is silver but silence is gold.
747. Standersby
see more than gamesters.
748. Still waters run deep.
749. Stolen pleasures are sweetest.
750. Stretch your arm no further than your sleeve will reach.
751. Stretch your legs according to the coverlet.
752. Strike while the iron is hot.
753. Stuff today and starve tomorrow.
754. Success is never blamed.
755. Such carpenters, such chips.
756. Sweep before your own door.

 

English Proverbs P-S

 

 


Don’t see what you’re looking for? Contact Us
This is a post from: BalliGifts.com Your # 1 Online Store for Cool Gifts

Share